Helping Other Individuals

Supporting Individuals You Previously Didn’t Know Achieve Success in Recovery

There are many ways to support social, health and mental health.  For this action, you could do the following:

 

Actions You Can Take

Invite someone in recovery to participate in a community garden.

There are many social, health and mental health reasons for participating in gardening, and there are increasing options in many communities for involving people who are in recovery to be a part of a group that is active in growing health vegetables. For this action, find a local community garden and see if there is a way for you to participate and then discuss with others about extending an offer to a recovery group to have one or two people join in with your gardening group. You could approach leaders in the increasing number of faith communities are creating gardens on their properties and ask if they’d be open to reaching out to people in recovery to have them be a part of the garden team. Even if they don’t have experience in gardening, they can benefit from the social engagement, learning new skills, and the healthy vegetables that they’d have an opportunity to eat. The others involved with the garden will likely gain a deeper appreciation of the stories, trials and victories of sustaining long-term recovery.

Carry naloxone and know how to use it to revive someone after an overdose

These days, it is far too common for ordinary citizens to be in an area where someone overdoses and needs to be quickly revived or they will die. Naloxone, often sold under the brand Narcan®, is the most common overdose-reversing medication. You can get training on how to administer Naloxone. Depending on where you live, you may be able to go to a drugstore and get some form of naloxone to carry with you to use if you see someone who has overdosed. In other communities, Naloxone kits may also be available in public libraries or from non-profit organizations.
This news story shares of a 16-year-old girl who saved a life shortly after getting training and carrying a naloxone kit.
For those not familiar with naloxone, Lena Wen, then the Health Commissioner of Baltimore, shares a powerful TEDx talk on Naloxone.

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Get trained as an “angel” to support a pre-arrest diversion program with your local police department

Talk to your local police department and ask them if they have (or are planning to launch) an “Angel Initiative” program as a pre-arrest diversion program to help people get help with addiction and substance misuse before they sink deeper into addiction and illegal activities. These programs are always looking for volunteers, either to be an “angel” who works directly with individuals who are trying to avoid or recover from addiction or as volunteers to help with the overall program coordination, promotion and administration. The more help then can get, the more benefit they can achieve while still having time to do their other important police work.

Angels typically volunteer for 10 hours per month, after receiving some initial training. As an angel, you can have a powerful impact in helping someone who is actively seeking help—and typically someone who is relatively early in their problematic use of drugs.

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Get Trained in Mental Health First Aid

It is possible in most communities to get in-person training on Mental Health First Aid.  There are also on-line training sessions.  If you do not have MHFA in your community, contact your local health department.  It is possible in most communities to get in-person training on Mental Health First Aid.  There are also on-line training sessions.  If you do not have MHFA in your community, contact your local health department.  It is possible in most communities to get in-person training on Mental Health First Aid.  There are also on-line training sessions.  If you do not have MHFA in your community, contact your local health department.

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